Bringing Earth's
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Timeline

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Cattle Photo Fries Photo Train Photo Mechanic Photo Lab Photo Manufacturing Plant Photo Geo Photo Plant Photo Moses Lake
1940s The Company’s beginnings From the beginning, J.R. Simplot makes business decisions for the long term. He meets a vital military need for less cumbersome food products during World War II by building one of the first vegetable dehydrating operations. To create a reliable supply of shipping boxes, J.R. starts a lumber company. > IMAGE GALLERY
1953 Simplot introduces frozen french fries to the world This breakthrough, first made possible by Simplot scientists in 1946, saves foodservice customers time, money, and storage space by eliminating the need for keeping large quantities of fresh potatoes onsite for hand-cut french fries.
1955 Simplot gets into the land and livestock business J.R. Simplot begins acquiring cattle that are fed by-products from his potato processing plant in Caldwell, Idaho, creating a valuable feed resource from what had previously been considered scraps and thrown away. Waste water from plant processes is used to irrigate nearby farm fields.
1967 Ray Kroc and J.R. shake hands and a business relationship is born
1980s Treatment plant in Heyburn J.R. Simplot dedicates a wastewater treatment facility at the Company’s Heyburn, Idaho, potato plant. The Company begins installing anaerobic digesters at its potato processing operations to treat plant wastewater and improve techniques for using that water to irrigate farm land.
1980s Reclamation at Smoky Canyon The Company begins a program to restore land at its phosphate mines to original condition. This reclamation plan continues today, and has been improved thanks to improved native seed mixes.
1991 A pipeline replaces trains The Company completes an underground pipeline to transport liquefied phosphate ore from Smoky Canyon Mine near the Wyoming border to its Pocatello, Idaho fertilizer manufacturing plant. This 87-mile connection eliminates the need for shipping ore by rail car, which reduces transportation charges and saves energy. > IMAGE GALLERY
1999 Moving grain faster, more efficiently Land & Livestock builds a grain-loading terminal at Mountain Home, Idaho, that is unique in the western states. The terminal accommodates freight trains with more than 100 cars, reducing costs and increasing efficiency by bringing more corn in one trip to feed cattle at the nearby Grand View feedlot.
2003 Long-term decisions made in Canada The Company completes construction of a 267,000-square-foot potato processing plant at Portage la Prairie, Manitoba. The location of the plant near East Coast markets, efficiency of stateof-the-art equipment and a nearby supply of quality raw potatoes promises sustainable operations for many years to come.
2009 Energy efficiency leadership Due to its leadership in energy efficiency, Simplot is invited by the U.S. Department of Energy to join the Save Energy Now Leader program and publicly formalize their goal of a 25 percent reduction in energy intensity over 10 years.
2011 Achieving Energy Excellence Four industrial factories reduce their energy intensity 25 percent, meeting their Department of Energy goal three years into a 10-year pledge.
2011 Plant sciences breakthrough Simplot Plant Sciences announces Innate™ technology, the biotechnology platform for improving crops, leading to new and better foods. The first generation of the technology was utilized in Innate™ potatoes with reduced levels of black spots and bruising leading to better quality, fewer rejections and less consumer waste. Read more
2013 Moses Lake Plant Honored for Environmental Excellence Moses Lake employees who were principally involved in earning a prestigious environmental award from the Association of Washington Business. Read more


1940s

1940s - The Company´s beginnings

From the beginning, J.R. Simplot makes business decisions for the long term. He meets a vital military need for less cumbersome food products during World War II by building one of the first vegetable dehydrating operations. To create a reliable supply of shipping boxes, J.R. starts a lumber company.

1950s

1953 - Simplot introduces frozen french fries to the world

This breakthrough, first made possible by Simplot scientists in 1946, saves foodservice customers time, money, and storage space by eliminating the need for keeping large quantities of fresh potatoes onsite for hand-cut french fries.

1955 - Simplot gets into the land and livestock business

J.R. Simplot begins acquiring cattle that are fed by-products from his potato processing plant in Caldwell, Idaho, creating a valuable feed resource from what had previously been considered scraps and thrown away. Waste water from plant processes is used to irrigate nearby farm fields.

1960s

1967 - Ray Kroc and J.R. shake hands and a business relationship is born

1980s

1980s - Treatment plant in Heyburn

J.R. Simplot dedicates a wastewater treatment facility at the Company’s Heyburn, Idaho, potato plant. The Company begins installing anaerobic digesters at its potato processing operations to treat plant wastewater and improve techniques for using that water to irrigate farm land.

1980s - Reclamation at Smoky Canyon

The Company begins a program to restore land at its phosphate mines to original condition. This reclamation plan continues today, and has been improved thanks to improved native seed mixes.

1990s

1991 - A pipeline replaces trains

The Company completes an underground pipeline to transport liquefied phosphate ore from Smoky Canyon Mine near the Wyoming border to its Pocatello, Idaho fertilizer manufacturing plant. This 87-mile connection eliminates the need for shipping ore by rail car, which reduces transportation charges and saves energy.

1999 - Moving grain faster, more efficiently

Land & Livestock builds a grain-loading terminal at Mountain Home, Idaho, that is unique in the western states. The terminal accommodates freight trains with more than 100 cars, reducing costs and increasing efficiency by bringing more corn in one trip to feed cattle at the nearby Grand View feedlot.

2000s

2003 - Long-term decisions made in Canada

The Company completes construction of a 267,000-square-foot potato processing plant at Portage la Prairie, Manitoba. The location of the plant near East Coast markets, efficiency of stateof-the-art equipment and a nearby supply of quality raw potatoes promises sustainable operations for many years to come.

2009 - Energy efficiency leadership

Due to its leadership in energy efficiency, Simplot is invited by the U.S. Department of Energy to join the Save Energy Now Leader program and publicly formalize their goal of a 25 percent reduction in energy intensity over 10 years.

2010s

2011 - Achieving Energy Excellence

Two industrial factories reduce their energy intensity 25 percent, meeting their Department of Energy goal three years into a 10-year pledge.

2011 - Plant sciences breakthrough

Simplot Plant Sciences announces Innate™ technology, the biotechnology platform for improving crops, leading to new and better foods. The first generation of the technology was utilized in Innate™ potatoes with reduced levels of black spots and bruising leading to better quality, fewer rejections and less consumer waste. Read more

2013 - Moses Lake Plant Honored for Environmental Excellence

Moses Lake employees who were principally involved in earning a prestigious environmental award from the Association of Washington Business. Read more